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Causes of Poverty in Pakistan

Causes of Poverty in Pakistan Pakistan is a poor country. Its economy is facing fluctuations now a day. At the time of independence Pakistan has very low resources and capital, so the processes of progress were very slow. Unfortunately the politicians of Pakistan were all not well aware of modern global system and the progress processes and the needs of country. Due to bad policies today Pakistan is facing a lot of problems. The continuous failure of policies leads the people of country to miserable conditions. The major problem in the country is poverty which is becoming the cause of crime and social disorder. It is difficult to point out all causes of poverty in Pakistan but the major causes of are given below: Government Policies: Government is not well aware of present conditions of country. The policies of government are base on the suggestions of officials which do not have awareness about...


 
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one in three women take anti-depressants pills

A survey has found that one in three womenare resorting to using anti- depressants at some point in their lives. The staggering figure has revealed many outwardly strong mothers and daughters are battling mental illness. One in four of those quizzed had been taking happy pills for at least 10 years. Eighteen per cent of all users did not tell their family, a tenth did not confide in their partner. The study found almost half of women currently taking anti-depressants had been using them for at least five years. Fifty-seven per cent who had taken the medication were not offered any alternatives to drugswhen they were prescribed. The findings raise worrying questions for the NHS, women’s group Platform 51 said. The organisation – formerly the YWCA - quizzed 2,000 women in England and Wales. “These shocking figures reveal an escalating crisis in women’s use of anti-depressants,” the Sunquot...


 
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Parents are more worried about the rising cost of their children’s education than the dangers of drugs and teenage pregnancy.

A study has shown that parents are more worried about the rising cost of their children's education than the dangers of drugs and teenage pregnancy. According to the poll of about 700 parents with teenagers, four out of 10 said their main concern was for their child's financial future as they worry about tution fees and the pressure of student debt. The London College of Accountancy's research showed only 27 per cent of parents rate drugs as their number one concern for their children. Teenage pregnancy and bullying polled 12 per cent and seven per cent. And only five per cent of those questioned admitted they worried about their teenagers' safety on the Internet. "It comes as no surprise that rising higher education costs are causing parents major concern," the Daily Express quoted Professor Steve Lumby, who headed the research, as saying. "The increasingly competitive job market means degrees are becoming more...


 
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Sony Ericsson Xperia PLAY 4G

The Sony Ericsson Xperia PLAY 4G is a fusion ofgamming and communications in a single device, where it will combine a PlayStation - certified gaming device with the capabilities and portability of an Android smartphone. For beginners, the Xperia PLAY 4G will come with dedicated gaming controls. The slide-out controller comes with a D-pad, dual analog touch joysticks, a couple a shoulder buttons and the quartet of iconicPlayStation symbol keys which comprise of the circle, X, square and triangle. Moreover, a 1GHz CPU and Adreno 205 graphics processor will keep things pumping from within, plus with a front-facing VGA camera in addition to a 5 megapixel rear camera, Wi-Fi connectivity, and sevenXperial PLAY optimized games including, Dungeon Defenders Second Wave, Asphalt 6 Adrenaline, Star Battalion, Madden NFL 11, The Sims 3, Tower Bloxx: My City, and Crash Bandicoot.


 
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The unsung sense: How smell rules your life

Smells shape our moods, behaviour and decisions, so why do they barely register in our conscious lives? I TRY to forget about potential onlookers as I crawl around a central London park, blindfolded and on all fours. With a bit of luck, the casual passer-by might not notice the blindfold and think I'm just looking for a contact lens. In fact, I'm putting my sense of smell to the test, and attempting to emulate the sensory skills of a sniffer dog. Just as a beagle can swiftly hunt down a pheasant using only its nasal organ, I am using mine to follow a 10-metre trail of cinnamon oil. Such a challenge might sound doomed to failure. After all, dog noses are renowned for their sensitivity to smells, while human noses are poor by comparison. Yet that might be a misconception. According to a spate of recent studies, our noses are in fact exquisitely sensitive instruments that guide our everyday life to a surprising extent. Subt...


 
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Your amazing brain: Top 10 articles

A vast increase in brain research in recent years is giving us a much improved picture of what's going on in our white and grey matter. In case you hadn't noticed, NewScientist.com is now making the last 12 months' of articles free for everyone to read. Here we round up the top 10 in-depth articles on the brain from 2008 Is it worth going to the mind gym? The latest lifestyle trend is to sharpen your mental skills or stave off the effects of ageing by training your brain. But is there any evidence that such techniques work? New Scientist investigates Brains apart: The real difference between the sexes The supposed differences between male and female brains are a constant source of controversy, not to mention humour. Research into the topic is pointing unerringly to one conclusion: there is not just one kind of human brain, but two. A unified theory of the brain? It would be great to have a single, elegant des...
 

September 18, 2011