Category - Fashion and Style

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Jen’s Jeans
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Clothing
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Maggie Gyllenhaal Strikes A Pose For Vena Cava
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Young London Calling: Phoebe English
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Jaeger London
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Kate The Great

Jen’s Jeans

A crowd turned out uptown at Bloomingdale’s last night for the launch of Hoyle Jackson, a new line of denim and basics by stylist twin sisters Nina and Clare Hallworth and costume designer Geoffrey Roiz. Among the group was Jennifer Aniston, who the Hallworths count as a client, along with the likes of Brad Pitt, Hugh Jackman, Reese Witherspoon, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Kirsten Dunst, to name a few. It was their impressive roster of clients that prompted them to create Hoyle Jackson.

“We created this line out of necessity for clients we couldn’t find things for,” says Roiz, the brand’s founder, who has costumed films like Tropic Thunder and Spider-Man 3. “People are looking for a uniform—something that is simple and clean.” To fill the void, they designed jeans made from Japanese selvedge denim, twill trousers, and a handful of button-down shirts. It looks like a mission accomplished here; Aniston, known for her casual jeans and T-shirt style, looked eager to don denim from the label.

Maggie Gyllenhaal Strikes A Pose For Vena Cava

Vena Cava’s Sophie Buhai and Lisa Mayock didn’t have their show as usual this season, opting instead to have their celebrity friends, including Nora Zehetner and Tennessee Thomas, model their forties-esque clothing in their Spring ‘12 lookbook. If you thought you had already seen all the looks, think again. Today, Style.com shares a few more offerings from the duo, modeled by Maggie Gyllenhaal.

“Maggie was our ideal woman to represent Vena Cava,” Mayock tells Style.com. “She’s a movie star in the traditional sense, but also has the modern-day qualities we admire and adore in friends, collaborators, and accomplices.”

Young London Calling: Phoebe English

 

London is a hotbed of young talent in fashion, and the city is known for supporting the young, the wild, and the penniless like few other fashion capitals. Just in time for London fashion week, Style.com checked in with three of the city’s most exciting emerging designers. Today, meet Phoebe English.

London learned of Phoebe English, 25, last season when she debuted her first collection of gothic black rubber and faux-hair goddess dresses down the Central Saint Martins M.A. catwalk. After winning the prestigious L’Oréal Professionel Creative Award, English graduated from the classroom to her own cozy white-walled studio in East London. While the designer has been one of the most talked-about new talents of the year, she nearly didn’t pursue fashion. “For a long time, I couldn’t decide between fashion and acting,” she says. “I spent a summer auditioning at drama schools across Britain and didn’t get into any of them, so I did a course at Saint Martins to see what it was like and never looked back.”

Judging by her Spring collection, English made the right choice. This season, the designer was inspired by the raw surroundings of her new studio, as well as her walk to work. “I walk here every day and that clumpy walking movement is really an inspiration for some of the shapes,” explains English. In an attempt to move away from what she describes as the “frenetic” fluidity of her last collection, which primarily featured eveningwear, English turns her focus to organic separates crafted out of tightly pleated, destroyed canvas. Having a background in knitwear, English’s Spring ‘12 (mostly black) collection marks her first time using fabric rather than materials. In addition to her first show, English’s M.A. collection will be included in British-ish, a Giles Deacon-curated exhibition that runs throughout fashion week at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum

Jaeger London

Today’s Jaeger collection looked pretty spiffy. Although designer Stuart Stockdale did send a few misfires down the runway, including a whole group of pieces bedecked with oversize collars and bows, in general these clothes seemed like exactly the neat yet relaxed pieces the Jaeger woman is looking for, come warmer weather.

The show opened with cool geometry: A trim navy suit and longish yellow shorts with triangular cutouts established the tone; scalloped shifts and A-line blouses with knife-pleated underskirts spun it in a gamine direction. The palette proceeded to build in richness, harking back to the early-seventies Jaeger heyday with hits of mustard and bright orange and multicolored nautical stripes. The mustard culottes—which also appeared in cream and navy—were must-haves. Reverting back to the gamine, Stockdale also sent out several excellent, very simple black and white dresses and tops featuring broderie cutwork that read like enlarged eyelet. They felt very fresh. Ditto the hats: Flat, wide-brimmed numbers, they appeared in a variety of colors, and helped to elevate the look of the collection as a whole.

Kate The Great

 

Hollywood sends the fashion world plenty of pretty envoys. See: Kate Bosworth. But for all the popularity the fetching L.A. native enjoys among the frock-makers, a lot of moviegoers still know of her as the surfer babe from Blue Crush.

With Straw Dogs, the designer darling is hoping to ride a new wave. Bosworth plays a struggling actress who moves back to her hometown in Mississippi with her husband (James Marsden), where she strikes up an uneasy reacquaintance with an old flame (Alexander Skarsgard). Like the 1971 Sam Peckinpah film it’s based on, Straw Dogs unfolds in an atmosphere of sex-inflected menace; it also contains a pivotal rape scene, which has been the focus of most of the buzz around the remake.

“A lot of people ask me about the rape scene, which was sort of challenging,” Bosworth explained at last night’s Tribeca Grand premiere. “But what was equally challenging was tracking the tension that the characters are going through.”

Bosworth also helped put together her character’s wardrobe, and it seems her stylish sensibility was a hit with the suits. According to director Rod Lurie, “The head of the studio, Clint Culpepper, is also a big fashionista.”

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